Harris Tweed returns to Uig in the Hebrides

This is good news

julz crafts

From NEW 3D WEAVING in the last post to AN OLD WEAVING TRADITION getting a new life.

I am no Luddite, and I don’t actually know what the Hattersley Domestic Loom, used by Harris Tweed Weavers looks like, but I was thinking about the fact that I came across both these articles at the same time, and I chose to feature the NEW over the OLD first, and that weaving as a commercial enterprise, such as HARRIS TWEED has a long history.  

Luddites were the original movement that objected to the “new commercial looms” in the late 1700’s – I vaguely remember from my school history lessons on the Industrial Revolution.

Would someone like to contribute an INFORMATION SHEET (i/sheet) on the topic?


Copied verbatim from the Herald Scotland – you can see the original newspaper article HERE.

Harris Tweed weaving returns to old haunts Harris Tweed weaving returns to old haunts

It is worn by…

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NORDIC BRONZE AGE TRADITIONS – A TEXTILE STUDY (I 1)

T E X T I L I S

[My Chamber of Textile Thoughts. No: XLIV | By Viveka Hansen]

A number of years ago I published three articles in the year book Elbogen about textile trades and material culture of the Malmö area in southernmost Sweden – stretching from the earliest settlements up to the 20th century. My aim with this new series of “Textile Thoughts” is to translate parts of these texts into English, and put its local historical events into a wider European perspective with additional discussions and images. This first part introducing the Stone Age period and continuing into the Nordic Bronze Age (1800 to 500BC) – a time when skin garments went through refinement simultaneously with the early development of woven woollen fabrics and plaiting techniques.

An impression of a tiny textile fragment’s technique found just south of present day Malmö (Petersborg), during an excavation of a settlement. The minuscule piece is believed to have been either plaited or made using a knotless netting technique called “sprang”. The find has its origin in the younger Stone Age period and was examined by the Danish textile historian Lise Bender Jørgensen. She emphasised that the nature of the raw material has not been possible to verify, as the carbonised find weighs one gram only. But after C14 analysis it could be established that it once originated from 3970-3630BC and is therefore one of the oldest textile remnants from northern Europe. Illustration: Helen Hodgson (2001). Notice: Place names in italic are geographical areas, today within or very closely situated to the city of Malmö. An impression of a tiny textile fragment’s technique found just south of present day Malmö (Petersborg), during an excavation of a settlement. The minuscule piece is believed to…

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